Islamic views on interracial dating world of dating limited

A majority of Muslims quietly go along with it, some have a lot of questions and some are ready to quote verses from Quran and make declarations that they are out of the pale of Islam.

By the way, this is not a Muslim problem exclusively; it is a problem of all faiths, again it is not the faith, but the whims of the guardians of faith.

Today, nearly 40% of Muslim women marry outside of their faith and most of them without conversion.

Researching the matrimonial sites, out of 1000 Muslim women, only 30% of them over the age of 50 have listed Islam as their religion, the rest have called them spiritual but not religious, and add that religion is no bar to them.

There are not enough Muslim men out there, and interfaith marriage is one of the few viable options, and most women rule out the idea of marrying someone from their home country as it does not work out culturally.

"It is almost like there is something they recognise about each other, there is an unconscious connection there - same kind of families, same kind of faith informing how they live life," Mrs Al-Yousuf says. However, inter-faith relationships also challenge both faiths. But Mrs Al-Yousuf, who now lives in Oxfordshire, thinks this figure could be higher as there could be many more unmarried couples who choose not to marry due to the complications caused by selecting a ceremony.

When two planes hit the World Trade Centre on 9/11 in 2001, Heather Al-Yousuf says she felt sick when her husband suggested they recite the opening Sura from the Koran.

"That was quite an important psychological moment for me to get through, that negative association with all things Islamic." The family did recite the Sura, and Mrs Al-Yousuf also sang the Lord's My Shepherd.

"I suppose, when the chips are down, that's the religious experience that you want to hand on to your children, regardless of what else," says Mrs Al-Yousuf.